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Tom Coburn is a Big Fat Jerk


moonbat150


Home of the Barking Moonbat


 

Sunday, March 27, 2005

I live in ancient forest ...

... which really comes as no surprise to me, but it's nice to have it confirmed.

Telling you which would be telling you too much --- I prefer anonymity --- but I will tell you that I'm pleased to have all my suspicions confirmed about the rarity and depth of this landscape.

We're described by the conservationists as not just ancient forest, with trees 500 years and older, but an unusual crossroads between west and east, north and south. Upland forests, savannas and glades, the meeting poinr of the forests of the east and the southern grasslands.

Our ancient forests survive only because the land is so steep that it's unsuitable (supposedly) for anything other than what it is. Of course, the fact that this is Indian land likely has something to do with it.

Living here only confirms for me why it's so important to save these lands. Over the course of a year, I've had black bears, beavers, fox, every imaginable variety of woodpecker, pelicans, two kinds of bluebirds, cuckoos and more hiding out here.

Hummingbirds make their home here for 7-8 months of the year. Monarchs have shifted their migrations over this area. I don't think we used to be on their annual migratory route --- we are now, most likely because we're still wooded and wild.

I have four kinds of honeybees. I haven't even been able to count the kinds of frogs and toads and treefrogs, some of which only inhabit the Florida coasts and southern Georgia.

I have lizards, skinks, endangered snakes.

I can barely walk outside without hearing the rustle of some critter racing to get away from me.

This is why I stay here, even though it's miles from anywhere and most of my old friends think I'm bats and people just don't understand. I consider it my new job to take care of these lands and all the critters they harbor.

And knowing it's officially ancient forests makes it all that much more important.

4 Comments:

At 6:56 PM, Blogger Leila M. said...

Good God, it's like Kingsolver's book Prodigal Summer (now where's the loner hot dude, anyway...)

 
At 7:04 PM, Blogger MJ said...

How fortunate you are to live in an ancient forest! I don't think you're bats, or if you are it must be a good thing. I love seeing your home through your eyes, and I admire you for caretaking a sacred place.

 
At 7:36 PM, Blogger MJ said...

I can't figure if my comments are being left or what. Blogger is being very cantankerous. You may get this more than once:

How fortunate you are to live in an ancient forest! I don't think you're bats, or if you are it must be a good thing. I love seeing your home through your eyes, and I admire you for caretaking a sacred place.

 
At 4:19 PM, Blogger Lydia Daffenberg said...

Sittin' here envious. Would love to live in a similar environment--or have the ability to move to one!!

My favorite thing in life (pastime-wise) is enjoying nature, which sounds very easy for you to do on a daily basis.

My hubby and I do plan to eventually move to a location with lots of nature and privacy.

Ahhhh.
Cheers.

 

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